nuclear medicine

A nuclear medicine scan is a diagnostic test that uses a small amount of material, usually injected through an IV in your arm or hand, that helps visualize certain organs or bones.

Bone Scan: You will have an injection in your arm or hand, and then return approximately three hours later for your scan. You may take your normal medications and have regular meals. You will be encouraged to drink plenty of fluids between your injection and the scan and to empty your bladder frequently. If you are pregnant, nursing or suspect you may be pregnant, please tell your doctor.

HIDA Scan: You will receive an injection in your arm or your hand, then lie flat on the imaging table for the duration of the scan. 24 hours prior to the exam - eat normally, no extended period of fasting. 12 hours prior to the exam – do not take any painkillers. Six hours prior to the exam – do not eat or drink. If you are pregnant, nursing or suspect you might be pregnant, tell your doctor.

Thyroid Scan: A thyroid scan is a two-day procedure. Day one, you will ingest a small capsule that your thyroid gland will absorb. You may leave immediately after taking the capsule. Day two, no preparation is needed. You will lie on the exam table and be asked to be very still for the duration of this 30-60 minute exam. If you take any medication for your thyroid, you will be asked to discontinue them for a period of time before the exam. If you have had an x-ray, CT or MRI exam with IV contrast, tell your doctor. IV contrast can interfere with the scan for up to six weeks. If you are pregnant, nursing or suspect you might be pregnant, tell your doctor.